Prerna Lal Schubiner - Associate, Writer, Organizer, Political and Digital Strategist


Posts tagged Immigration


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Feb 17, 2014
@ 11:11 am
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Left Out of the Narrative: LGBTQ Undocumented Detainees »


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Feb 17, 2014
@ 11:05 am
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Migration Is Not So Beautiful

Migration is beautiful mostly for the colonizer, who gets to dabble in “exotic” foods, be enriched by our “exotic” tongues, obtain a cheap labor force, and benefit from the innovation that new migrants bring. But migration can also devastating and disruptive for the vast majority of us—who are uprooted from our homelands, live without seeing close family members for years, continuously traumatized by assimilation efforts, and virtually imprisoned within the walls of the U.S.


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Feb 16, 2014
@ 3:46 pm
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Photos from my visit to the amazing Al-Jazeera Studio in Washington D.C. to talk about immigrant justice. These journalists are consummate professionals, and so well organized. Great experience. 


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Jan 29, 2014
@ 1:01 pm
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Police Violence In India Drives A Gay Couple To The U.S. »

“We are feeling like homosexuality is a crime everywhere … there is not any protection here,” said one of the men.Their yearlong journey across more than 10 countries to seek asylum in the United States.

 


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Jan 26, 2014
@ 12:29 am
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juliosalgado83:

#FuckYourBorders

Thanks for your great art-work, Julio!

juliosalgado83:

#FuckYourBorders

Thanks for your great art-work, Julio!


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Nov 7, 2013
@ 10:36 am
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Immigrant Rights v. Reform: A Circus of David vs. Goliath »

The drawbacks of the comprehensive immigration legislation currently drafted are well-documented by many in the community. Advocates at the Detention Watch Network lament that the legislation would do nothing for immigrant detention, and instead, make matters worse. In his new book, Reform Without Justice, Professor Alonso Gonzales points out how reform further criminalizes Latinos by punishing undocumented presence with a one year prison sentence for illegal entry and three-year prison sentence for illegal re-entry. Investigative reporters have documented how increased border enforcement will lead to more migrant deaths. Race Forward has exposed how millions would be left out of reform. The criticisms are many to the point where the legislation has fractured support from the community for immigration reform, and instead, pushed organizations to pursue other actions, such as the Not One More and Bring Them Home campaigns.


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Oct 30, 2013
@ 2:37 pm
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But We Are Criminals: Countering the Anti-Racial Justice Frame of Immigration Reform »

One of the greatest victories of right-wing extremists such as the Tanton Network has been to push professional immigration reform advocates to adopt right-wing talking points. As such the entire immigration reform debate is framed along the binary of good immigrant and bad immigrants. Since 2005, immigration reform advocates have waged a national campaign for comprehensive immigration reform on the premise of exchanging a militarized border wall, privatized prisons and increased surveillance for a pathway to citizenship for a limited number of undocumented immigrants. Under the current frame, the 11.7 million who are undocumented and aspiring to be American have to “get right with the law,” “get in line,” speak English, pay fines, and pay taxes in order to gain some sort of legal status in the U.S. These are professional messaging points that bear no truth and no justice for immigrants.

Instead, the good immigrant and bad immigrant frames has hurt advocacy for racial and immigrant justice. For example, when immigration reform advocates hold up banners saying “We are Not Criminals…” they inadvertently buy into the notion that certain demographic groups are criminals. When they emphasize a pathway to citizenship at the expense of basic human right to live, work and travel, they willfully ignore what citizenship means for a young, black man such as Trayvon Martin. When they criminalize and exclude various categories of immigrants from the blueprint for immigration reform, they make it harder to ally with movements for criminal justice and racial justice.


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Oct 16, 2013
@ 10:57 pm
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luigimonstre:

#Dream30 needs your help. Please take a photo with a sign saying “im from _____ and I stand with the #Dream30. #BringThemHome.” and send it to claudia@theniya.org
Los #Dream30 necesitan de su ayuda! Por favor tómense una foto con un sign que diga “I’m from (estado en que vive) and I stand with the #Dream30. #BringThemHome” y mande la foto a claudia@theniya.org.

luigimonstre:

#Dream30 needs your help. Please take a photo with a sign saying “im from _____ and I stand with the #Dream30. #BringThemHome.” and send it to claudia@theniya.org

Los #Dream30 necesitan de su ayuda! Por favor tómense una foto con un sign que diga “I’m from (estado en que vive) and I stand with the #Dream30. #BringThemHome” y mande la foto a claudia@theniya.org.


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Oct 13, 2013
@ 5:51 pm
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3 notes

resident-zoopolis:

9 OCT 2013: From the legacy of giants


"Thirty-four undocumented immigrants were detained at the Texas-Mexico border on Sept. 30. That fact by itself is unremarkable—thousands of immigrants are held in detention in the U.S. at any given time. What set this particular group of immigrants apart is that they showed up on the Mexico side of the border and openly proclaimed their desire to re-enter a country they consider home, without papers. By attempting to cross into the U.S. as part of a concerted campaign, they are forcing the U.S. immigration system to confront their humanity and create pathways for legalization."
"This bold action, organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance (NIYA) under the banner of #BringThemHome, is the second chapter of a radical new way to draw attention to the struggles of undocumented immigrants—in particular young people who call themselves DREAM activists after the proposed DREAM Act. These youth were raised in the U.S. and most have graduated from high school or college, but now have few opportunities for a future because of their undocumented status."


(SOURCE) 
a. Sonali Kolhatkar ”Dreaming With Dignity” TRUTHDIG
b. Aura Bogado”Dream 30 and Others Cross the Border” COLORLINES

resident-zoopolis:

9 OCT 2013: From the legacy of giants

"Thirty-four undocumented immigrants were detained at the Texas-Mexico border on Sept. 30. That fact by itself is unremarkable—thousands of immigrants are held in detention in the U.S. at any given time. What set this particular group of immigrants apart is that they showed up on the Mexico side of the border and openly proclaimed their desire to re-enter a country they consider home, without papers. By attempting to cross into the U.S. as part of a concerted campaign, they are forcing the U.S. immigration system to confront their humanity and create pathways for legalization."

"This bold action, organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance (NIYA) under the banner of #BringThemHome, is the second chapter of a radical new way to draw attention to the struggles of undocumented immigrants—in particular young people who call themselves DREAM activists after the proposed DREAM Act. These youth were raised in the U.S. and most have graduated from high school or college, but now have few opportunities for a future because of their undocumented status."

(SOURCE) 

Video

Oct 13, 2013
@ 5:50 pm
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2 notes

resident-zoopolis:

“‘Dreamers’ Activists Cross Mexico-U.S. Border in Bid to Stay in United States”