Family and Immigration Law Attorney. Moonlighting as a queer, POC fiction lover and writer. Avid Bollywood fan.


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Apr 12, 2014
@ 11:19 pm
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92 notes

positive-outlooks:

Beautiful morning to see the Cherry Blossoms! :) (First time seeing them after living in the D.C area for 15 years! Haha.)

positive-outlooks:

Beautiful morning to see the Cherry Blossoms! :) (First time seeing them after living in the D.C area for 15 years! Haha.)


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Apr 12, 2014
@ 11:18 pm
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1,611 notes

naturalsceneries:

Cherry Blossoms, Washington, D.C. Source: lunchablezz (reddit)

naturalsceneries:

Cherry Blossoms, Washington, D.C.

Source: lunchablezz (reddit)


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Apr 8, 2014
@ 9:51 pm
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893 notes

nprglobalhealth:

Where Everyone In The World Is Migrating, In One Gorgeous Chart
In a study published Thursday in Science, geographers analyzed global migration patterns around the world over the past 20 years. 
The result is this beautiful infographic and interactive app. 
Qz notes two interesting findings from the study:

1) Adjusted for population growth, the global migration rate has stayed roughly the same since around  since 1995 (it was higher from 1990-1995).
2) It’s not the poorest countries sending people to the richest countries, it’s countries in transition—still poor, but with some education and mobility—that are the highest migratory contributors.

Where are the highest rates of migration ? Qz explains:

1) The largest regional migration is from Southeast Asia to the Middle East. This is largely driven by the huge, oil-driven, construction booms happening on the Arabian Peninsula.
2) The biggest flow between individual countries is the steady stream from Mexico to the US. (In fact, the US is the largest single migrant destination)
3) There’s a huge circulation of migrants among sub-Saharan African countries. This migration dwarfs the number leaving Africa, but the media pay more attention the latter because of the austerity-driven immigration debates in Europe.



Learn more.
The graphic here shows 75 percent of migration flows from 2005 to 2010.(Circos/ Krzywinski, M. et al.)

nprglobalhealth:

Where Everyone In The World Is Migrating, In One Gorgeous Chart

In a study published Thursday in Science, geographers analyzed global migration patterns around the world over the past 20 years. 

The result is this beautiful infographic and interactive app

Qz notes two interesting findings from the study:

1) Adjusted for population growth, the global migration rate has stayed roughly the same since around  since 1995 (it was higher from 1990-1995).

2) It’s not the poorest countries sending people to the richest countries, it’s countries in transition—still poor, but with some education and mobility—that are the highest migratory contributors.

Where are the highest rates of migration ? Qz explains:

1) The largest regional migration is from Southeast Asia to the Middle East. This is largely driven by the huge, oil-driven, construction booms happening on the Arabian Peninsula.

2) The biggest flow between individual countries is the steady stream from Mexico to the US(In fact, the US is the largest single migrant destination)

3) There’s a huge circulation of migrants among sub-Saharan African countries. This migration dwarfs the number leaving Africa, but the media pay more attention the latter because of the austerity-driven immigration debates in Europe.

The graphic here shows 75 percent of migration flows from 2005 to 2010.(Circos/ Krzywinski, M. et al.)

Photoset

Apr 8, 2014
@ 9:49 pm
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6,748 notes

kateoplis:

NPR covers all 2,428 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, so you don’t have to.

The results are beautiful.


Photoset

Apr 8, 2014
@ 7:14 pm
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8 notes

Photos from the Beyond Bollywood exhibit at the Smithsonian


Photoset

Apr 8, 2014
@ 7:11 pm
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2 notes

Photos from the April 5th Not One More Deportation action in Washington DC


Quote

Apr 8, 2014
@ 12:43 am
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30 notes

In a way, immigration is already a queer experience. Immigration creates ruptures of time, place, homeland, family. It creates scattering, and forces a breakdown and rearrangement of identity. Immigrants are made to reformulate their communities and support systems. Detention centers are harmful for everyone. Our solidarity is with all immigrants and undocumented people, not just those whose genders and sexualities fit under ‘queer’. Our commitment is to detention abolition broadly.


For us, #queeringimmigration means challenging immigration dialogues to include an analysis of gender and sexuality-based violence, and challenging queers to show up for immigrants of all genders and sexualities. To support immigrants constantly and materially. To show up.

From #Not1More Queer Detainee To #Not1More Immigrant Detention Center by Janani Balasubramanian and Jamila Hammami (via thisisnotindia)


Photoset

Apr 8, 2014
@ 12:42 am
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873 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Immigrant youth, families & community members, including activists from the California Immigrant Youth Justice Alliance, greeted President Obama on the way to a DNC fundraiser in Santa Monica, California today demanding an immediate stop to deportations. 

The Obama administration has deported more than 1.7 million people throughout his presidency. If these rates continue, nearly as many people will have been deported under his administration than during the years of 1892 to 1997.

The number of deportations is set to reach 2 million by 2014. 


Link

Apr 8, 2014
@ 12:42 am
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60 notes

N.Y. family fighting son’s federal deportation order »

aljazeeraamerica:

Continue reading


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Apr 7, 2014
@ 3:16 pm
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15 notes

adam-wola:


"Handcuffs hurt, we don’t have a soft pair"

”* Every station has medically trained personnel. If the alien still insists on further medical evaluation or care, they are obligated to provide it. You can’t ‘almost’ have a heart attack.
”* Handcuffs hurt, we don’t have a soft pair
”* Swearing is unprofessional, not a human rights violation.
”* You may be pushed to the floor when being arrested”

— From a Border Patrol official’s December 23, 2010 e-mailed response to complaints from Mexican government consular officials. (Page 5 of this PDF.)
The Mexican government was raising issues about the treatment that Mexican citizens were receiving during long-distance “lateral” deportations. During these (known in Homeland Security parlance as ATEP, or Alien Transfer Exit Program), migrants are deported hundreds or thousands of miles along the border from where they were apprehended. The process routinely involves a handcuffed bus ride of more than eight hours’ duration.
The National Security Archive obtained this document via a Freedom of Information Act request.

adam-wola:

"Handcuffs hurt, we don’t have a soft pair"

”* Every station has medically trained personnel. If the alien still insists on further medical evaluation or care, they are obligated to provide it. You can’t ‘almost’ have a heart attack.

”* Handcuffs hurt, we don’t have a soft pair

”* Swearing is unprofessional, not a human rights violation.

”* You may be pushed to the floor when being arrested”

— From a Border Patrol official’s December 23, 2010 e-mailed response to complaints from Mexican government consular officials. (Page 5 of this PDF.)

The Mexican government was raising issues about the treatment that Mexican citizens were receiving during long-distance “lateral” deportations. During these (known in Homeland Security parlance as ATEP, or Alien Transfer Exit Program), migrants are deported hundreds or thousands of miles along the border from where they were apprehended. The process routinely involves a handcuffed bus ride of more than eight hours’ duration.

The National Security Archive obtained this document via a Freedom of Information Act request.